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VOTE BY MAIL IN FLORIDA

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If you Vote by Mail in Florida, here’s what you can do to track your VBM ballot and ensure that your vote counts.

1. Update your Signature

When you vote by mail, your signature on the outside of the ballot certificate envelope needs to match the signature that is on file with the elections office. In order to ensure your vote by mail ballot is accepted, contact your local Supervisor of Elections to confirm and update your signature as soon as possible. 
Click this link to find your SOE office.

2. Track Your Ballot

If your County Supervisor of Elections (SOE) has a method to track your Vote by Mail (VBM) ballot on the Supervisor’s website, track your ballot to ensure that it was received.

3. Contact Your Supervisor of Elections:

If your Supervisor does not have such a system, within 3 days of mailing your VBM ballot you should contact your SOE to confirm that your ballot was received.

4. If Your Ballot Was Rejected:

If your VBM ballot is rejected for a missing or mismatched signature, under Florida law the SOE must provide you with an opportunity to cure or remedy the problem, including updating your current signature that is on record by means of your ‘cure’ affidavit. 

  1. “The supervisor shall, on behalf of the county canvassing board, immediately notify an elector who has returned a vote-by-mail ballot that does not include the elector’s signature or contains a signature that does not match the elector’s signature in the registration books or precinct register. The supervisor shall allow such an elector to complete and submit an affidavit in order to cure the vote-by-mail ballot until 5 p.m. on the day before the election.” 

    See F.S. 101.68 (4)(a).  

5. You Have a Right to Remedy Your Ballot:

If your VBM ballot is rejected for a missing or mismatched signature, under Florida law the SOE must provide you with an opportunity to cure or remedy the problem.  

 
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New report: “Vote-By Mail Ballots Cast in Florida”

In our new report "Vote-By-Mail Ballots Cast in Florida,” we found that vote-by-mail ballots cast in the 2012 and 2016 general election had a higher rejection rate than votes cast at assigned precincts on Election Day and at early voting sites. We also found that younger voters and racial and ethnic minority voters were much more likely to cast mail ballots that were rejected and were less likely to have their ballots cured.